Bawal Sans

We got invited to Tipong Filipino Type Exhibit 2019. The type design to be showcased should somehow reflect the city that we’re in. Here in Cubao, Quezon City, we noticed a lot of signage around our neighborhood and throughout the city. These quickly painted passive-agressive reminders served as our inspiration for our variable font Bawal Sans.
People often DIY their way to achieve or preserve some order in their surroundings — with passive-aggressive or witty and playful signages written haphazardly in bold capital letters, from condensed to ultra wide depending on the available space. 
Proper typesetting is a luxury. As creative as we are as a people, this is not a priority when what we need urgently is something that gets the message across, period. 
Bawal Sans is the DNA of the DIY signs we see everywhere: a no-nonsense font that is as loud and clear a statement as the message itself is, a font that gets the job done now, fast, period. Niceties? Maybe later.
 
Bawal Sans averages the look of the DIY signages and reminders we see everyday in the streets to create an actual font system that reflects how we function when we’re in survival mode: fix it now, do it quick, we’ll just make it better with niceties on the next chance we get.
Designed to do one job — getting the message across, loud and clear even from a considerable distance — Bawal Sans is a bold-weight font with flexible width that adjusts to the dimensions of the application, just like the hand-painted signs that inspired it.  And with only capital letters, it retains the passive-aggressive character of DIY signages and reminders everywhere. 
While the letterforms are very basic with almost no design system, the font is itself a visual language — one that’s so direct and explicit that it leaves no room for question or doubt, and it eliminates the need for repetition, no matter the message.

Viber stickers by Together We Design

Poster by CNN Life Philippines

Music Video by Sandwich

Bawal Sans is a variable font with flexible width that adjusts to the dimensions of the application, just like the hand-painted signs that inspired it. It can go from Ulta Condensed to Ulta Expanded and anything in between. And with only capital letters, it retains the passive-aggressive character of DIY signages and reminders everywhere. While the letterforms are very basic with almost no design system, the font is itself a visual language — one that’s so direct and explicit that it leaves no room for question or doubt, and it eliminates the need for repetition, no matter the message.

Together with

Isay Roque : Copywriting